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be made public so that the people and media organizations can supervise the government's efforts to more fully and more effectively. this will also in a way force enterprises and government to firm up our own responsibilities. and help the people to take some precautionary measures. since we breathe the same air, we have to work hard together. everyone should pitch in, and as far as the government is concerned, we will show greater resolve and take actions to reassure the peoples, thank you. [speaking chinese] >> translator: china's websites, mr. bremer can you talked a lot about the goals and the best of reform. we pay close attention to the reform of the reeducation through labor system. mr. premier, is there a timetable for reforming it? [speaking chinese] >> translator: let me answer your question very precise. the relevant authorities are working intensively on the plan to reform the reeducation through labor system. and the plan might be unveiled before the end of the year. thank you. [speaking chinese] [speaking chinese] >> translator: i noticed one detail, mr. premier. in the cou
to no state. attacking states, laying low state governments, depleting the taliban, defeating al qaeda -- iraq. it will not stop it because terrorism, like sustainability, like markets, are interdependent in their character. so what we have created in the beginning of the 21st century is a deep asymmetry between the challenges we face and the political response the political institutions we have to respond to that. every challenge is interdependent, global cross frontier, and the primary political actors that respond are bounded, frontiered, independent nation states. and in that asymmetry, you can see the dysfunction of the modern world. we watch, for example, starting four or five years in copen hagueen and going through mexico city and dubai and nations came together to renew the kyoto protocol already out of term of the date. at least to embrace that antiquated document and failing to do so. and going home and saying that is because our sovereignty says china said the u.s., says now canada, even leaders on keogh know doesn't permit us to monitor, to report to international body, doesn't pe
's effectiveness in supervising governments expenditure and revenues, improve the structure of government expenditure and revenue. and in favor of area that will have direct benefit for the people's lives. and the financial sector we will pursue market-oriented reform of the interest rate and of the exchange rate. we will develop a multitiered capital market and raise the share of direct financing. we will also protect the lawful rights and interests of investors, especially small and medium investor your we will also drive economic transformation. the important thing is to further open up the services sector. of course, looking ahead, our trade, especially trading goods, will continue to grow and even at high speed in the years ahead. that will create enormous opportunities for the world, and help chinese enterprises to upgrade themselves in the course of fair competition. [speaking chinese] [speaking chinese] >> translator: will improve people's well being, and to do that we need to reform the income distribution system. we need to confront the two biggest gaps in chinese society. the g
that the government had any role in the financial crisis, it was in failing to regulate adequately either those institutions or the mortgage originators who profited by selling mortgages to people who couldn't afford them. the book traces the influence of this narrative into the specific provisions of the dodd-frank act. i argue in the book that this narrative is false. it was bad history, and it produced worse policy. it is certainly true that the private sector had some role in the financial crisis, but this was relatively minor when compared to the government's effort throughout the clinton and in part of the bush administrations to degrade mortgage standards in order to increase home ownership. this contrary view was never put before the american people in time for its implications to be considered in the debate over dodd-frank. if that debate had occurred, it's unlikely that the dodd-frank act would have been enacted in anything like its current form. now, why did this debate not occur? why was there no competition in ideas on this matter? that is what i'll largely talk about today. for th
governors in jail, it's one of the most corrupt governments not just in the country -- time magazine rated the most corrupt goth -- governments in the world. number one was venezuela, number two was north korea, number three was illinois. [laughter] now, illinois' really bad, but if i take a drive about an hour and a half north on i-94, i start to get a smile on my face, and i pass into the dairy state. [cheers and applause] i get a smile because i know i'm in a state that has a leader. a state that has a leader that stood up to special interests, that looked the unions in the eye and made reforms that were not really popular at the time but are now proven effective. conservatives across the country could look to the governor of wisconsin as a model that you could be courageous, be called out, go to a recall and win with more votes than you did the last time. [cheers and applause] as a student, we need more leaders like scott walker. and as conservatives, we need to promote people like scott walker to run for office and encourage them to continue. ladies and gentlemen, i am honored to intr
and focus on that. the system separate from the government eliminate the model with the private sector benefit from the government guarantee come in many government race, private sector rewards. nature the secondary market was privately financed capital we insist on government funds. the maximum cutting a private sector was not the part of the bill portion of it. historically housing right to recovery. we need an alternative rapidly. thank you. >> the china recognizes general from california, mr. sherman for a minute and a half. >> in the 1930s detroit dat is no federal and home finance it did not work out. then we tried the gse model for organizations run by those reported for profit had a full implicit guarantee. so they took risks to benefit shareholders on the taxpayers, so that is not something we should return to. i'll agree with the chairman but if that's as far as it goes. but i do think we need a federal agency for more than one involved in the market. otherwise we'll see the end of the 30 year mortgage at fixed rates available to average middle-class families. what percentage
of a managed business or a managed government. i guess that would be saying that it's not a managed government. now, when we took up the budget in committee last week, i offered an amendment to strike the language that provided for the fast-track tax increase process. my amendment was meant to ensure that the tax reform would be conducted in a bipartisan manner to generate a more efficient, fairer and simpler tax code and spur economic growth rather than raise revenue through legislation that can be passed with a simple majority here in the senate. a simple majority vote would ensure that the minority party's views would receive little, if any, consideration. we'd have no input. debate time and the number of amendments that could be offered to improve the legislation would also be limited. we need to have an open process where all members can have their voices heard. we simply need to stop deal making and start legislating. we've had this system around here for awhile where we work from contribed crises that hav have -- contribed crises that have very specific dates in which the sky falls and
in the world. that is what the government set out to achieve. that's what is what we're dr delivering. they did a survey that ranks the most competitive tax regime in the world. three years ago we were near the bottom of the table. now we're at the top. in the global rate, we cannot stand still. today we step up the pace, our enterprise investment team offering generous -- they have done a great job help progress mote it around the country. they asked me to extend the holiday,ly i will. we're make our new employee shareholders more generous with income tax relief and increasing -- of business to the employees. company that look after employees and help them return to work will get new help through the tax system too. and we're going trouble to 120,000 pounds the size of the loans that employers can get for tax free to say for season ticketers for commuters. it's a great idea for the honorable friend and i'm happy to put in practice. my honorable friend and others, have put forward proposals to help investment in social -- enterprises. i listened and we will release a new tax to encourage privat
to what we are facing. so this budget grows government. let's not make any excuses. it grows government by increasing spending. and it grows government by a massive increase in taxes. just after we've had one a few months ago. and not counting the massive increase in taxes that's going to occur beginning in 2014 with the implementation of obamacare. when we add that up, when we look at the cost of that, we face dire circumstances. and you would think that the budget being offered to us would not increase debt by 42%, but would address the real problem. now, i know there's been a dispute about how much this budget revenue, taxes are increased. some say $1.5 trillion. those that have presented the budget simply say, oh, no, it's only $1 trillion. whether it's $1.5 trillion or only $1 trillion -- only a trillion, as if only $1 trillion in new taxes on the american people after they just got hit with more than .5 trillion a few months ago and probably hit with another $1 trillion in less than eight months as obamacare kicks in, it just defies credibility. and i think the investment communit
of government, government-run pensions, the unionized government work force and bobby jindal with school choice. he's planning this year to abolish the corporate and individual income tax, moving in a very different direction than the national democrats want to and winning elections with that approach. so there's a lot to be learned both by the failure of the romney campaign and the senate races and the successes the republicans have had at the state level. >> host: and we're taking your calls in this segment with grover norquist with americans for tax reform. the phone lines are open. democrats, 202-585-3880. republicans, 202-585-3881. independents, 202-585-3882. grover norquist known as an expert on some of these budget issues. you bring up the senate budget that we saw from budget chairwoman patty murray last week with. talk about that and how you think it compares to paul ryan's budget. >> guest: there are two major differences. they certainly go in different directions. the paul ryan budget balances in ten years and does not raise taxes. patty murray's budget never balances and raises taxe
on the cost of government and government run pension, unionized government workforce and bobby jindal with school choice. he is planning to abolish the corporate individual income tax moving in a very different direction the national democrats want to and winning elections with that approach. there is a lot to be learned both by the failure of the romney campaign in the senate races in the success of the republicans have had at the state level. >> host: we are taking your calls with grover norquist with americans for tax reform. our farmland or open democrats (202)585-3880 and republicans (202)585-3881. grover norquist known as an expert on some of these budget issues. you bring up the senate budget that we saw from budget chairwoman patty murray last week. talk about that and how you think it compares to paul ryan's budget? >> there are two major differences and they certainly going different directions. paul ryan's budget balances in 10 years and is not raise taxes and patty murray's budget never balances and raises taxes $1.5 trillion over the next decade. what the democrats and pa
, and government accountants now list climate change as a threat to our fiscal stability. now, today, as we enter the passover and easter season and as catholics the world over celebrate the selection of a new pope, we turn to voices of faith. they, too, call upon us. they call upon us to heed the moral imperatives of protecting creation and seeking justice for all people. they call upon us to reflect on our faith, on our relationship to our world and each other and on our responsibility to future generations. and they call upon us as president obama reminded us in his inaugural address to preserve our planet commanded to our care by god. i lay no claim to religious authority, but i must believe this -- something that harms others, something that disturbs god's creation, something that stands on lies and greed, protecting that must not be consistent with god's will. in his 2010 world day of peace message entitled "if you want to cultivate peace, protect creation," pope benedict xvi called upon the faithful, and i quote -- "to protect the environment and to safeguard natural resources and the clim
resolution 8, setting forth the congressional budget for the united states government for fiscal year 2014, revising the appropriate budgetary levels -- mrs. murray: i ask unanimous consent the reading be dispensed with. the presiding officer: without objection, so ordered. mrs. murray: i ask any time in quorum call be equally divided. i ask no amendments be in order for the remainder of today's consideration of s. con. res. 8. the presiding officer: without objection, so ordered. mrs. murray: i ask unanimous consent the use of calculators be permitted on the floor during consideration of the budget resolution. the presiding officer: without objection, so ordered. mrs. murray: i ask unanimous consent that emily sharp and michael brenson, detailees to the budget committee, be granted floor privileges for consideration of the budget resolution. the presiding officer: without objection, so ordered. mrs. murray: i ask staff be permitted to make technical changes to the resolution as necessary consistent with adoptions of the senate amendment including calculating the associated change under se
don't have time. whether redraw the limit regarding the use of drones that government agencies, where to reach out that line? under what circumstances do we require search warrant click should police use only for surveillance? of local government allowed jones to search for traffic violations and building code violation? should the federal government use drones to see whether their fraudulent clicks were reasonable limitations are appropriate for where and when to use drones. additionally, in examining the use, congress needs to examine the use and limits by private citizens in the air. where do we draw the line of balancing immediacy under the first amendment to be protected from invasion of privacy. another area is innovative use of drones and coming from a rural state as a chairman does, we have a lot of agriculture. drones can be used by farmers to help a farmer survey crops were quickly for early signs of disease. subform a spray crops to maintain baker, check livestock, prevent livestock and equipment. these are all timesaving and cost-saving benefits to agriculture. no farmer w
do not know of a family, i do not know of other units of government that as they're trying to wrestle with this question confine themselves to only looking at one side of the balance sheet. but that's what the house budget does. you know, i was thinking about this approach and this question about deficits not long ago, and it struck me that when i look at myself in a mirror, madam president, i always wish that i was thinner. i always wish i was thinner. but i've never once looked in a mirror and wished i was weaker. an all-cuts approach is like looking in a mirror and wishing your weaker because an all-cuts approach placks yo makes you wen education, weaker in defense, by laying people off in jobs, it makes you weaker because your unemployment rate is higher. it is like looking in the mirror and wishing your weaker. we have to be stronger. can we make cuts? sure we can and we have and we'll make more. but we ought to be focused on being stronger, about growing the economy and growing jobs. and that's why the approach that the senate takes is the right approach. because by utilizing re
for the united states government for fiscal year 2014, and so forth. mr. reid: mr. president, until 11:00, there is going to be conversation here on the senate floor. at 11:00, there will be six roll call votes. offices, senators should understand, the first vote will be 15 minutes, after that, ten minutes. as we said yesterday, we enforced it yesterday, when the time's up, we're closing it. if the republicans aren't here, too bad, if democrats aren't here, too bad. we're going to have a lot of votes today. so make sure everyone's here. understand if you're not, you will -- the clerks have been asked to turn the vote in. after the votes, we complete the six roll call votes starting at 11:00. there will be two hours of debate remaining on the resolution. therefore, unless something untoward happens, the vote-a-rama is expected to begin around 3:00 p.m. this afternoon. we hope everyone would be -- would understand that we have had about 400 amendments filed, 400. we're not going to do 400 amendments. the average that we have on these vote-a-ramas is between 25 and 35. and so i would -- e
of individual issues as opposed to being able to account for that 29% of all land the federal government operates that is now under your jurisdiction? >> it's a committed challenge. it's not that we don't know what to do. it's not that we don't have the tools. it is a tremendous challenge. it's not that we lack the commitment or the help and support of our partners. we have all of those things. we will get it done. >> so it's just a number of things you have to account for? >> it's a big job. >> thank you, mr. chairman. >> banks are sitting with us to ask those questions. good questions. we will start off with questions if i could for deputy secretary. focus for a couple of minutes on the next steps of the department that will be taken to improve the management of the department. the chair recommends the -- independently validate the effectiveness and sustainability that authority been made. just ask how will you do that? and also what type of reports will be available to this committee so that we can monitor the progress that is occurring and meet our responsibilities for providing good
with the whole family planning bill that was printed but not adopted but gradually the irish government did take responsibility nine years later with the measure and now that is of course, the controversial at all. meanwhile i was enjoying teaching law and a loved the interaction and i was practicing law and because of the opportunity to discuss tonight is state's constitutional law i quickly decided that was the area i wanted to focus on to take the test cases there issues of equality i would take them in the irish courts then there was the possibility these cases could be taken beyond the irish court just as the high court or supreme court because ireland had ratified the european convention on human rights and fundamental freedoms and all of that meant you could take decades having exhausted the remedies to go direct to strasbourg and the other possibility was to take cases to join the european union were there were directive said equal pay and equal opportunity binding on ireland there be a reference to go to luxembourg and argue then get a ruling because the irish court would be bound to ap
$7100. that's for an individual. for a family of four, the cheapest insurance that the government's going to allow you to buy is going to be over $20,000. now, you compare it to what the premiums are now for individuals, it's about $5,000 for an individual, that's the average price of private insurance, so you can just see an average of a little bit over 5,000 to over 7,000, and for a family of four the average right now is a little bit over $14,000. so that'll go up to 20,000. that's just going to happen with these exchanges when they get set up next year. of -- now, so that's the cost of insurance. but you were supposed to pay a fee or fine if you didn't have insurance. for somebody that makes about 50,000, that fine would be about 1600. if you make $100,000, it'd be over $2,000. but the thing is you really won't even have to pay that, even though that's already quite a bit less than the insurance would cost you. and the reason is because in the obamacare bill it's set up so that the irs, basically, will find it impossible to collect the money from anybody. you know, the irs, it
not have to deal with a government minder. i would use a cell phone and i hired a car from hotel, and call friends and get them to pass me to other people. so my goal was not to describe what saudi arabia ought to be like but try to understand and describe what it was like. saw want to talk today first about some observations about saudi society, in second about what those observations might portend about its ability or vulnerability, and then lastly, about scenarios that u.s. policymakers, which may someday include some of you in the audience, might face. saudi society, this probably should not have surprised me, but it did, it is much more diverse than we in the west think. there are people who live quite western lives inside their homes, and there are obviously people who seek to live a seventh century life. it is also much more divided than i realized, and much more dependent on government, because most people work for the government. the divisions are quite steep, so it's not in my view really a country as much as it is a collection of tribes with the flag. and it is divided by region
or woman on the street who knew how to spend their dollar more wisely than a distant federal government, and he did all in his power to prove it by cutting taxes. when governor jeb bush was in office, he cut taxes on floridians by $20 billion. let's talk about the size of government. when ronald reagan was in the white house, he dramatically reduced the ate rah of growth in federal spending and strove to reduce the size of the federal government. when governor bush was in office, he vetoed more than $2.3 billion in earmarked for higher state spending and retuesdayed the size -- reduced the size of the state's government payroll by 13,000 people. when ronald reagan did that on the national level, he did it with a purpose in mind. it was to spur the free market, create opportunity and provide incentives for businesses to frau. in his years in office, over 20 million new jobs were created in governor bush's state of florida, his similar philosophy and economic programs created a thriving state economy where 1.4 million new net jobs were added during his time in office. there are other fund
-american? >> guest: no, at the moment we have an ongoing dispute with the reigning government, which itself produces all manner of vicious propaganda against the united states or at about the great and so forth. so are actually quite popular. they are among the most pro-american populations in the greater middle east that it's unusual to find -- pollsters have not been able to find populations filled in any country. you find the rise and fall of approval of u.s. policies, which can sometimes the rep to demonstration where the two disputes between governments that we then throw into this catchall category as to what the problem is this underlying hatred. even though public opinion changes radically month-to-month in year-to-year. germans arrest about their opinion of the u.s. president under george w. bush it fell to a low of 12% approval. within a couple years obama with the day. approval was 92%. it's people who can make discriminating judgment on the basis of how they assess the new leader of the same country and many western europeans in many places were unhappy with an inarticulate proponent of
republican budget does, mr. president, it's focused on growing the economy, not growing the government. what the democrat budget here before the senate this evening does is it grows the government, not the economy. in fact, if you look at what the analysis that's been done, it's expected that the democrat budget would cost us 850,000 and reduce take-home pay for middle-class families by $1,500. the house republican budget takes serious the challenges facing this country, takes the steps that are necessary to save and protect medicare for future generations of americans, something that this budget, the senate democrat budget, does not do. i urge my colleagues to support this budget. it's a serious one that balances the budget in 10 years and puts our economy back in a growing mode and our fiscal house back in order. i yield the floor. omrs. murray budget raise: yawz. the presiding officer: is there a sufficient second? there appears to be. the clerk will call the roll. vote: the presiding officer: are there any senators in the chamber who wish to vote or to change a vote? if not, on this vote
light cameras. i think a great many of us, myself included, have very deep concerns about the government collecting information on the citizenry and with the ease and availability of drones there is a real concern that the day to day conduct of american citizens going about their business might be monitored, catalogs and recorded by the federal government and i for one would have very deep concerns about that. i would ask the question of amie stepanovich. do you share those concerns? and if so, what reasonable limitations should be considered to protect the privacy rights of all americans? >> anytime you come up with a new surveillance technology you are going to have instances where the technology catches bad actors doing bad deeds but those few instances are at the expense of dragnet, constant surveillance of all citizens as they go through rather daily life, not consistent with constitutional protection than what the country was built on. we need to prevent drones' from becoming alternatives for police patrols flying up and down when not talking about aerial drones driving up and down
. as a global fleet operator serving both commercial and government customers, reliability and continuity of service are our highest priorities. whether it's uav operations over afghanistan or the final game of the ncaa tournament or financial statements that have to be transferred securely around the world, um, we know that our customers expect flawless performance. to deliver this level of performance, we have to daily deal with a range of threats. probably a highest priority for us today is radio frequency interference. many times it's accidental, sometimes intentional. space debris and other challenges of space flight, cyber attacks, solar weather, space systems reliability, the fact that we today don't have an affordable technical solution for refueling and repairing satellites on orbit and last but not least, an international launch industry that's far from robust. now, our economy depends on the ability to create and instantly distribute vast amounts of data around the planet. space-based platforms have become a vital link in the national and global economies, and they're essential
organizations that do competency training and in many cases have partnered with the federal government and has tripled in size since the affordable care act at hhs has been interested in making sure those young starting out providers have the opportunity to get cultural competency training. many trainers do that in various parts of the country. another major resources the joint commission. my parents are health care providers, so why not all about sometimes a little bit of attention between the standards set out and how providers feel they are actually equipped to meet the standards. when the commission establishes new standards that could nondiscrimination on the basis of orientation identity started a project to make cultural competency materials were widely available so clinicians thought that they have the tools to make that change. there's a monograph from the joint commission that pulls together resources for mayra has mentioned for the others. >> hi, i work with whitman walker held and i'm happy to say they were often the anti-cascade remedy. here we do to a thick work in the community.
general control of the government presentation to the supreme court. the petitions to file, what responses to file, oral argument in the solicitor general also decides in the government will appeal an adverse decisions by district court or the court of appeals. the solicitor general has authority to decide when a federal they meet the eye and the supreme court or court of appeals. it's a broad portfolio that requires a large base of knowledge plus the ability to learn fast. the solicitor general does not control with y and doesn't start the process within the justice department feared cases that a writer for out to litigating division civil, criminal and thÉrÈse, and grants a natural resource and environment. then make recommendations, which go to the assistance. sometimes there's an internal conflict. the department of justice include the criminal division and those people always want to defend guards and seized their presence. sublimates divisions tends to favor and somebody has to resolve those on assistant to the solicitor general may think the criminal division statutory. prosecutio
on social and foreign policies in the united states and it became an official concern of the u.s. government beginning during the second world war and especially in the cold war when we began to have a scientific approach to measuring for an opinion to analyzing the source of resistance to the united states and coming up with policies to try to combat it the problem is they don't think like us and use our reasoning. but when we are talking about latin americans they are prisoners of their emotions and why they are having a protest right now not for example because we fought a war with mexico and wound up taking half of the mexican territory or there might be a cause but a national dispute over which we could argue about the merits. anti-americanism is a way of looking at the world as a kind of mirror and we have a monologue where we look out at the world we want the mayor to tell them that we are the fairest of them all. that makes for excellent fairy tales. they are not effective in advancing the national interest. >> host: we have been talking with max paul friedman rethinking anti-america
have medication that not only can prevent you from this, that the federal government considers antiviral treatment. so this is being able to change this. it didn't take away the eligibility category, but it allows states not be penalized for it in 26 states, you are not eligible at all states are still making. here is the map where they are. this is part of things that have been moved. as you can see, 27 had expressed support. seven of them are still weighing options and the rest of them are opposed. what does this mean for people with hiv? perhaps on the good news side, about% of people live in those states that have expressed theirs. 29% live in states with programs. but florida, for example, the florida legislature is not in support. 11% of people with hiv live in florida. as you can see, and i will make this clear, all of those states on the bottom, that as a challenge. even if all states were to expand medicaid, we know that insurance covered it alone does not equal access to care. it is the nation's safety net for people with hiv. the resources and gaps in care, we need t
the government with different culture were merged to a new department. in the early days at the department, the focus of both the administration and congress was moving quickly to prevent another 9/11-type attack on the homeland. management took a backseat to the effort. the dhs confirmed the fact when he testified before the committee last year. the management got shortchanged in the early days. it's taken years to dig out but the lack of the strong foundation left. that said, i want to give credit where credit is due. gao's recent report confirms there's considerable progress at the department. and integrating the departments and overlaying the component. the latest high-risk report includes fair amount of good news. because gao acknowledges the progress and narrowed the area on the high-risk list. the department deserves credit for the detailed plan to address all of gao's concerns and high-risk report, which i believe is unique among all the agencies on the high-risk list. i want to briefly review the improvements. in doing so i agree with gao permitted leadership of dhs has been criti
$250 a year for health care. but the government has reimbursted all the increases in the actual price of diagnostic and the actual utilization of treatment and i did diamostic higher than the private sector systems. and this tricare problem will increase even further when the affordable care act pushes everyone in to buying a medical plan, because for all of those who are not insured now, particularly guards and reservists whom at least 30% according to a recent study don't have insurance. it will be cheaper to buy to the tricare system then even to pay the penalty for not having insurance. another key decision taken in 2004, in response to the recruiting shortfall was to adopt higher pay scale indexing in the pentagon. previous pay increases were linked to the employment cost index, but in 2004, the department changed that to use the employment cost index plus 0.5%. this is added a whole another layer of cost to the dod base. for the past or two or three years congress has been having to repeal the benefits. to increase the copay for tricare, but politically it's difficult. you will
an ongoing dispute with the iran and the iranian government that has propaganda against united states but we're actually quite popular with the iranian state are the most pro-american population of the greater middle east. it is unusual to find and pollsters have not found populations that are filled with haters of america but what you do find is the rise and fall of approval of u.s. policies which could be a interrupted of demonstrations that we throw into the catchall of anti-americanism as what the problem is the underlying hatred even though public opinion changes radically from month to month the year-to-year germans were asked about their opinions of u.s. presidency george to view bush fell to the low of coal% but obama was elected and approval was 92% was that a population of haters? no. they to make discriminating judgments on the basis of how they assess the new leader of the same country so western europeans were unhappy with the leader they saw as an inarticulate proponent of unilateral action and who had a swagger in his step and not interested in their opinion and when the presi
was just remarking for the first time a government and while that we've had sunshine when we started an evening program. so appreciate you coming in and being with us to our mission is to preserve and tell the significant stories of kentucky and ohio valley region system and culture. a part of the culture and political culture or cartoons. weaponize cartoon collection your. we have one example of actually thomas nast cartoon over here that our speaker might have time to point to later, and we'll see. if we have any additional questions, the curator concerted bring up to speed. if you're not a member, we would love to have you join us. we are private, nonprofit historical society and not supported by government funding. we would appreciate your membership. this is the commercial part of our program. i will now move along to watch you were here. i want to thank c-span for being here, and also i see a number of students here from presentation academy and i believe trinity, so we always welcome you and thank you very much for joining. dr. fiona deans halloran is a department chair of u.s
branches of the arizona state government in the preceding years and of course, i have left the track record and i think the president had sent people out to uncover the press coverage of anything i was involved with and to look at papers in connection with a record. i guess they had not uncovered anything to looks scary so he decided to do that. i was at home the day they've wanted to come now to talk to me. my husband and i had built a sun-dried adobe house in the phoenix area 1957. that was a challenge you could buy the other kind but in this country today it is very hard to buy a sun-dried adobe bricks that somebody has made then dried and in a frame in the sun and that is what we've wanted to use. i ate them and in scottsdale to build some houses like that and he could tell us how to get sun-dried adobe so we followed his advice and found a starving young architect who was willing to designed a house so we got it built and i loved it. it was so fun until you see it and touch it you probably cannot appreciate why i liked it so much but it looks good, it feels good good, and it is wonderf
talking about without involving government-run spectrum? >> guest: so we'll drill down on your question there in a minute, want to know more about what you're thinking there. so each tv station runs traditionally on six megahertz. it's possible for them to channel share three megahertz apiece. so if you add up those six or those threes, it takes a lot to free up enough spectrum to get to that 60 that folks want in manhattan or chicago or l.a. so can you find, let's say, 10, 15 broadcasters or maybe more in the new york market to give up their spectrum or to share with others depending on how you want to use your math to get there? so what did you mean by the government-run spectrum? >> host: well, will government-run spectrum be part of this auction process? >> guest: there were some stories was it late last year, todd, about whether or not there'd be some nationwide, government-run, free wireless broadband network? maybe it was earlier this year, actually. >> earlier this year, yeah. >> guest: and there was just no basis to that. folks were confusing and conflating the idea of unlicens
involving government run spectrum? >> we'll get to the spectrum and the question in a minute when we know what you are thinking there, so each tv station and it's poll to share 3 megahertz a piece. add up the six or three, it takes a lot to free up the spectrum to get to the 60 that was hoped for in chicago, manhattan, or l.a.. can you find, let's say 10, 15 # broadcasters or maybe more in the new york market to give up their spectrum, particularly to share with others? depending on how you use the math. what do you mean by "government run spectrum"? >> host: will government run spectrum will a part of the process? >> guest: late last year, there was a story about some nationwide government run, free wireless broadband network, maybe earlier this year, actually, that story was printed, and there was just no basis to that. i think people were confusing and conflating the idea of unlicensed spectrum. i've been a proponent of unlicensed uses of what we call the td white spaces, the unused tv channels in certain markets, and they are scratch spectrum if you will, and it's more ideal for low p
bello, vice president of government affairs for intelsat, who's going to speak about the economic role of satellites and the commercial and security implications from the space threats. and then dr. joan johnson-free johnson-freese, professor of national security affairs at u.s. naval war college. she's going to talk about the role of space in our daily lives and how the space threats can threaten our national security. we will put our formal statements for senator cruz and mine in the record. your written testimony will be inserted into record. and if you just give us a quick summary so we can get into the questions. please. >> trying to i will confess given this topic today i was disappointed that bruce willis was not available to b the of ts witness to testify on the panel. >> we might get a trailer from armageddon, and show that. >> mr. chairman and members of the subcommittee, i am pleased to have the opportunity to update the committee on nasa's programs and our approach to addressing the risks, impacts, and solutions for space threats. one space threat is near earth objects, or
the way we viewed citizen involvement in government, changing the way we think about our elected officials and the ability to create up star movements. i think all that was incredibly important and the beginning of the women's movement all that great activism that it produced and all of that we are seeing that directly play out today whether it's the election of barack obama or the continued advancement of women in congress so all that is a direct result of their activism. that being said there is a lot of work left undone and i think that we now spend three fourths of our entitlement money on people who are over the age of 30 and it used to be we spent three for some people under the age of 30 in terms of the amount of money and investment. it's not in terms of generational warfare but i think we need to have a conversation about how we are dividing our priorities. this is not a generation that expects to get those entitlements by the way. this is not a generation that has and he believes the government going to give them out money. >> host: the activism you talked about from the baby boo
representatives of the black community. the community had to govern in our own interest and we will take that honor make that happen. the idea was not just about standing up to the police. it never was from the beginning. the party was very much about creating stewardship and self governance and community self-governance. while the initial development of the party and the national threat was there the strategy of self-defense, a lot of what became really the center of a party practice in 69 and onward was free brac is for children and community programs about taking care the community. here you had the war on poverty and yet you had children starving here in the united states. the black panther party said we are going to feed the children in our community. this was the breakfast program and they had liberation -- i want to say a word about the party. the party was attacked by the federal government not only is an organization that's really the history and the political possibility of the party was attacked. if you look at the documents of j. edgar hoover thinking about the threat of the
president, to keep this government open. now, they say they want to keep the government open. they don't want a shutdown. so why not get that vote done with? senator mikulski has led in a beautiful way with senator shelby -- a very bipartisan fashion. let's vote on that bill, keep the government open, as senator mikulski said, "show the country we can work together," and get to the one thing the republicans have been saying, not for months but for years, that the democrats have not done a budget. now, the truth is, instead of doing a budget, we did the budget control act. so of course we distinguis did . as a matter of fact, the budget control act was actually, in many ways, more specific than a budget. but set that aside, they went out on the campaign trail, they attacked democrats, "where's your budget? where's your budget?" well, guess what? under the able leadership of my friend from washington, senator murray, there is a budget, and it is well-done. and it has strong deficit reduction and strong investments. it's balanced in a way that the ryan plan is not. it saves medicare where
the library had been run privately and the federal government had kept all of president nixon's papers in washington, one of the outcomes of watergate, and my job was to bring it together and have a federally funded and administered library in california with the papers. so we started this oral history project 30 years late. and after all, it's much better when you get people when they're just out of the administration. and another since talking years later the time to, and may be more candid. the really, really older gentleman of the entity for the library had been with richard nixon in the '60s. you just mentioned something about him pushing him out. without exception, the men who had been with them in the '50s, he pushed away when he got to the white house. and he brought close to him younger people. he enjoyed having of the people around, but younger people he could mold and shape. and a lot of the trouble that arose was that these younger people were willing to do what he wanted them to do. whereas the older people and the numbers we interviewed wanted, kept saying no, don't do th
viewed citizen involvement in government, changing the way we think about our elected officials and the ability to create upstart movements. think all that was incredibly important. the beginning of the women's movement, all that great activism they produced, and that -- all of that, we're seeing that play out today. whether it's the election of barack barack obama or continued advancement of women in congress. there's a lot of work left undone, and i think that there's -- we now spend 3/4 of our entitlement money on people who are over the age of 30. used to be we spent 3/4 on people under the age of 30. it's not a question of generational warfare, but i think we need to have a conversation about how we're dividing our priorities. this is not a generation that expects to get those entitlements. my general has any belief the government is going to give them that money -- >> host: well, the activism you talked about, from the baby-boomer generation, that activism that has trickled down to millenials or do you see them as more politically apathetic? >> guest: i think the activism
for the united states government for fiscal year 2014, and so forth. mr. reid: mr. president? the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. reid: as we just heard, the senate has resumed consideration of the budget debate. s. res. 8, the budget resolution. we'll continue debate during today's session. senators will be notified when votes are scheduled, of course. now, mr. president, the budget has 34 hours left and then following that we're going to have some votes. it's up to the two leaders, the managers of this bill, whether they have votes before the 34 hours expire. now, mr. president, the these are two experienced senators and they can handle this -- they both know how to handle this budget, but it would seem to me that we should move as quickly as we could to debating these issues. i hope senators come and offer their opinions as to the budget that chairman murray has brought to the senate floor. maybe some people want to talk about what passed the house yesterday, the ryan republican budget. but everyone should understand that this time will run out at the latest tomorrow at 7:00
government other than for the essential personnel the day that this occurred in 63. but, i am pretty certain that the commemoration is mostly going to focus on dr. king and i have a dream. and i know that -- we all know this and most of us can recite parts of it and chunks of it especially towards the end. it's a great speech. it's optimistic, hopeful, it is king at his best when it comes to the delivery and the style and emotional appeal but also frees as dr. king in 1963 in this moment. he's talking about ecology and the brotherhood, which are fine themes and messages but it freezes him and obscures' the complexity of king and of the freedom struggle and the complexity of the 1960's. so tonight i want to talk more about another march, the poor people's campaign in 1968 which is what dr. king was working on when he was assassinated in memphis. alarmed by what he saw as a vicious circle of violence by the state with police harassment and brutality or as well u.s. military involvement in southeast asia and then the response by frustrated african-americans and very frustrated at the slow pace
shouldn't have a say in things. democracy is an invalid form of government. the friend and fellow catholic of newman said to gladstone, the prime minister, who said, the pope is just a tact. every form of government, and he said don't worry, catholics don't pay attention to the pope when he talks politics. well, more and more, we're not paying attention, not only on contraceptives which is abandoned by catholics for decades now, but even on things like literal body railism about the body and -- literalism about the body and blood of jesus. the most hold under cattics under 30 done in the 1990s showed that 40% of them already didn't believe that it was the literal body and blood of jesus, catholics under 30, and we don't act that way anymore. there's an old saying, the way you pray is the way you believe. you act out your faith. well, when i was an altar boy, if you dropped a hogs, that was gone, and all had to gather around and doing in intowt it. if you spilled wine, you had to wipe it up and burn all of that. now, you know, to avoid having that problem, you are given a little thin host s
on housing issues, including government mortgage financing by fannie mae and freddie mac. live coverage starts at 10 a.m. on c-span3. later in the days ahead of immigration and customs enforcement testifies about the recent release of more than 2000 illegal immigrants from detention centers. lastly john morton testified the releases were done for budgetary reasons. live coverage begins with the house judiciary committee at 1 p.m. eastern also on c-span3. >> thirty-four years ago today, we began providing televised access to the everyday workings of congress and the federal government. the c-span networks created by america's cable companies in 1979 and brought to you as a public service by joerg television provider. >> next, former and current obama administration officials discussed the effect of new health care of new health care law can have on hiv/aids. the panel also looks at some of the challenges of implementing the law. the center for american progress hosted this hour and 20 minute event. >> good morning, everybody. my name is neera tanden and i'm the president of the center fo
, because people were looking back to nixon saying you can have a good government republic that once the government of the efficient. although under mix and it did grow. the the republican party is so different now because there is no room for nixon so there was much more interesting richard nixon's domestic agenda. everybody is interested obviously in the foreign policy side like the end of the war in vietnam. but i noticed this in the second term of the bush administration there was more interest in the domestic policy. it is a real problem for historians because of the tapes richard nixon is not always very happy about his domestic policy. i was wondering since we are looking at the earlier period for next-gen, where would you put him in the new deal in the 1950's? would you say he is interested in a continuation of the new deal? what role does he see the government playing in the society? >> certainly think he had no desire to undo the new deal. she was very much aware and in favor of a catastrophic health plan. don't forget when nixon was growing up his family was poor, but he h
understood why the government would come in the philippines, would utilize that approach to resolve this conflict. because after all, efforts have been made to reach an agreement to come to a mutually beneficial agreement. and that had failed. and, therefore, the ability to petition and to have a resolution of this through that method was logical. and i think that the resolution of these disputes have become by nature of using the rule of law. and that dispute mechanism resolution that exists under the treaty is an effective way, as i'm explaining to this you -- explained to the now, and effective way to address this problem. because our goal and our diplomacy is based on urging governance, not just the type of nationalist rhetoric that leads to confrontation. but instead, to work multinationally and order to resolve disputes. we can see periods in the past when nations with competing claims came very close to resolution, and, unfortunately, because of nationalist voices, in both countries, we failed to achieve that opportunity to resolve a situation. and that's what i think the uni
presentation. [applause] >> in 1978, steven hess surveyed 450 journalists covering the federal government for u.s. news organizations. over 30 years later, the author now a senior fellow emarry at that time at the brookings institute visits former subjects to see how things have changed in their careers and journalism in general. this is about an hour. >> senator rubio, i better drink my water first. >> this is very exciting for me, for my wife, because we were friends of karla and david coen. feel we were here at the creation of politics and prose, and the incredible job they did and the idea there would be a second act would be so creative and so exciting under brad and lisa. just means a lot to us. i'm very, very pleased that you would come out on valentine's day. i love you all. in fact i brought pens that are red. i will sign all books with red pens and put in a heart and an xo, hugs and kisses, as well. if you wish them. and the ancient history behind this book has been largely told by brad and his introduction. i did come to brookings in 1972 after being on the white house staff of two p
was that the fundamental job as any government, and we were the government of iraq is to provide law and order for the citizens. law and order meant having the adequate combat ki devotee of the ground in iraq right from the start which had basically three elements people keep focusing on the american troop level that that is only one of three elements. we needed to look at the number and quality of the coalition forces and we had some problem with them and we needed to look in particular at the area that i had the most disagreement i would say with the pentagon was of the question of assessing the quality of the iraqi forces we were training in the army and the police i felt that it is going to take a long time coming and indeed it has to bring them up to a sufficient capability. i was concerned that the military in the fall of 2003 was hoping that they could use iraqi security forces to allow us to draw down the american troops rather substantially in the spring of 2004. that was my main concern about american troops is that substituting iraqi is for americans before they were ready. >> i wan
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